Gothic Doors

Doors in Gothic houses were usually unglazed. In the most strongly Gothic houses, doors were ledged, with vertical planks or planks in a herringbone pattern. Oak was a prized wood. After 1860 it was more common to see glazed and leaded front doors.

Typical colours used for painted front doors of pine or deal were dark blue, chocolate brown (favoured by Eastlake), deep red, or else olive green. Graining was also used.

A key feature of the front door was a set of ornamental fittings, ideally in wrought iron. Regular door-to-door postal deliveries began in 1840 and the small letter-plate was introduced. Larger items were received by a maid or other domestic servant. The other furniture was a knocker and a pull to help to close the door.

  • brass knocker
    brass knocker
  • brass, lion head knocker
    brass, lion head knocker

Internal Gothic doors might have been ledged, or else were panelled. As with the front door, those of better quality wood were polished, while those of pine and deal were either grained or painted. They were fitted with finger plates of iron or else brass.