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Bricks and Brass • View topic - Damp Proof Course In Victorian Property

Damp Proof Course In Victorian Property

Forum for discussing period houses.

Damp Proof Course In Victorian Property

Postby The_Laddie » Mon Aug 10, 2009 11:15 am

Hello All,

I was just wondering if anyone has had the same problem or indeed a solution to a problem I have.
Long story short, When we bought our Victorian sandstone house survey said Rising Damp. Not convinced I chose not to take up their offer of chemical injection, instead I removed my whole front lawn which sat above the DPC. Now that I can see what is going on, I realise that someone in the past has pointed round where the DPC is and it basically bridges the gap between the foundation layer and the walls also contributing to any "Rising damp".
If I dig out the pointing it is evident that the original what looks like lino or asphalt strip dpc has disappeared in parts and a lot of the area is packed with mud. 8O
Has anyone in the past reinstated so to speak a damp proof course as I'm not that keen to go raking about between the founds and the walls and hammering in bits of slate etc. Also some of the places where the DPC should be look to be quite deep but if I fill them with stone and point it, that will defeat the purpose as it will once again bridge the damp course.

Sorry for the long post, and any suggestions or advice greatfully received.

Cheers
Chris.
The_Laddie
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DPC

Postby Simon TL » Fri Aug 21, 2009 10:03 pm

Chris

My feeling is that the traditional slate dpc is not 100% effective, but as long as you avoid bridging, minimise splashing etc, then the impact on the walls is manageable.

It is poss that your house has had a more modern material inserted.
Simon TL
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Postby The_Laddie » Tue Sep 01, 2009 7:56 am

Hi Simon,
Thanks for the reply. It's not a slate DPC that is there, it's more like lino or tar strip although a lot of it has disintegrated. I was going to try to push slate into the gaps and try to point top and bottom without bridging over. The spaces in the current DPC are just filled with cement or mortar and any bits that have existing DPC have had the same cement or Mortar smeared over the outer face hence joining founds to upper wall. I just don't know if the effort is worthwhile and if I'd be as well just filling the gaps with stone and lime mortar.

Thanks again
Chris.
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Posts: 19
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