Bare bricks

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Bare bricks

Postby Saam » Thu Jun 28, 2007 12:58 pm

In an attempt to get to the root of a damp problem (about which I will post separately) I took off all the plaster of a small wall (1m X 2.40m (H)) in the basement ("lower ground floor") of a 1890 conversion.

My 12 year old, who's room this is in, really likes the look of bare brick so I'm looking for some advice how to make this wall slightly more attractive and practical (could dust be an issue?).

The bricks (some damaged ones) are a mix of yellow and red, which is fine, but there also seem to be different types of mortar used which does not seem in the best of conditions.

Also the bricks now have a grey-ish appearance because of the 'leftovers' and residue of the plaster.

The end result definitely doesn't need to look perfect but we do want a slightly more clean look.

How can i get rid of the residue?

Should the wall be re-pointed and/or otherwise repaired?

Many thanks.
Saam
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Bare brick

Postby Simon TL » Fri Jun 29, 2007 9:22 am

Hi

This is a difficult one. In theory the steps would be to tidy up the brickwork and pointing - the latter in a 'bucket handle', recessed style as I expect the brick arrises (corners) are rather rounded and pointing flush will mean very wide joints. And then apply stabilising solution which will stop the dust.

However, it is likely that stabilising solution will stop or reduce evaporation so the other problem may rear its head. So unless you have found and dealt with the damp cause, the safest option would, I'm afraid, be to replaster and use a breathable paint.
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Postby Saam » Fri Jun 29, 2007 11:16 am

Thank you Simon

I had planned to post seperately about the damp problem but you made me realise that of course it's intrinsic to the whole issue.

The damp appears to be caused by a small area of concrete floor missing (25 x 25 cm) underneath a doorpost. This is where (about 18 years ago) the door frame was actually put into the ground resulting in rotting wood (post and nearest skirting) with the damp creeping up into the wall.

This seems to be the sole cause for the damp. I would think the solution would be in repairing the floor. Any thoughts on that?

Would the fact the wall is part of a basement room perhaps make the bare brick idea difficult?
Saam
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Hole

Postby Simon TL » Fri Jun 29, 2007 2:25 pm

In that case you may well get away with it! Yes, repair the hole. Perhaps then give it the summer(?!) to dry out before using stabilising solution.

...but having spoken to SigmaKalon (who offer Stormshield Quick Dry Stabilising Solution ), if you apply lightly - perhaps by spraying, and avoiding drenching the bricks, it will leave some breathability.
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Postby Saam » Fri Jun 29, 2007 3:32 pm

Sounds good! This 'Stormshield' doesn't make it shiny, does it?

Also, would you know of a good brick cleaning product / method? This to clean off the plaster 'residue' and what looks like bits of mortar.
Last edited by Saam on Fri Jun 29, 2007 5:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Saam
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Postby Saam » Fri Jun 29, 2007 3:38 pm

BTW You're being a great help Simon!!
Saam
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Brick Cleaner

Postby Simon TL » Fri Jun 29, 2007 6:19 pm

You need 'brick cleaner'; it is an acid so use carefully.

As to shine, it may have a *slight* sheen but the roughness of the bricks will collect dust so it will soon look more matt ;)
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Postby Saam » Fri Jul 06, 2007 1:18 pm

Am now looking for an idea of costs to have the brick wall rebuilt. It measures c.100 cm(W)x 240 cm(H) and 25 cm thick.

I've tried cleaning an area with Brick cleaner, but it hasn't done the appearance any favours: it seems to make the bricks 'dull' and more grey-ish.

I would prefer to use some of the existing bricks and hopefully some reclaimed (London stock or red) bricks.

It could be a load bearing wall.

Any ideas?

Cheers
Saam
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